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What you need to know about heat stroke: prevention and treatment

What you need to know about heat stroke: prevention and treatment
Posted at 11:23 PM, Aug 11, 2019
and last updated 2019-08-12 00:50:22-04

CENTRAL TEXAS — The heat is on, and will stay with us longer than first thought.

As Heat advisories and heat warnings will likely extend into the week.

It comes, as many of us looked for ways to beat the heat on a hot, hot Sunday.

We found folks looking to say cool at Central Texas parks, like the one in the Kendrick area where a new splashpad recently opened.

While lots of older kids flocked to the water and to the sprinklers, smaller children and their parents found slightly less hot breezes on the slides and swings.

No matter where you went Sunday, hopefully you found a bit of a breeze, to help with some of that "evaporative cooling" where the wind crosses your sweat and cools us off just a little.

If shopping's your thing, we found plenty of people at the Central Texas Marketplace.

Many went from store to store, quickly, to stay out of the heat.

and if the shade and a breeze didn't provide enough relief, the ice cream truck had some sweet ways to lower your core temperature just a little bit.

The thing to watch out for, in the coming week? Signs and symptoms of heat exhaustion.

The signs may develop suddenly or over time, especially with prolonged periods of exercise.

Possible heat exhaustion signs and symptoms include:

Cool, moist skin with goose bumps when in the heat...

Heavy sweating...
Faintness...
Dizziness...
Fatigue...
Weak, rapid pulse...
Low blood pressure upon standing...
Muscle cramps...
Nausea...
Headache...

If you notice any of those symptoms:
Stop all activity & rest....
Move to cooler place...
Drink Cool water or sports drinks...
Contact your doctor if your signs or symptoms worsen or if they don't improve within one hour....
If you show signs of heat exhaustion, seek immediate medical attention if YOU Become confused or agitated, lose consciousness, or CAN'T drink.
You need immediate cooling and urgent medical attention if your core body temperature (measured by a rectal thermometer) reaches 104 F or higher.