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Central Texas Republicans split on whether they will challenge Electoral College certification

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Posted at 10:50 PM, Jan 05, 2021
and last updated 2021-01-05 23:50:06-05

On Wednesday, Congress is set to vote on the final step in the presidential election, the Electoral College’s certification of Joe Biden’s win. But several lawmakers are planning to object.

Several members of Congress are planning to object the certification during what is traditionally a routine, joint session.

“There are election officials that have not agreed to meet with people. They have stiff-armed them. They have not tried to resolve those differences. It’s my hope that will come out of this as a resolution,” said newly elected Central Texas Congressman Pete Sessions.

Sessions claims there’s been a lack of transparency to Biden’s win in several swing states.

“I believe that it’s not too late to go out and look at every one of these jurisdictions. Really satisfy people about what the facts of the circumstances are,” he said.

“This is very unusual, even when there's discussion on who won the electoral votes in Florida in the 2000 presidential election after the Supreme Court issued its ruling against Al Gore, and Gore backed off and refused to sponsor or allow any objections to the count in Congress,” said Texas A&M University-Central Texas Associate Political Science Professor Jeffrey Dixon.

Other Republicans aren’t on board with Wednesday’s tactic.

“The electoral vote from the very states have been certified. As I understand the Constitution and federal law, those are conclusive,” Senator John Cornyn told 25 News during an interview in December.

The senator also announced Tuesday that he’s not planning to object the certification.

In a lengthy letter, Cornyn noted that he has supported President Donald Trump’s right to challenge election results in the courts, but that Trump's lawsuits have gone nowhere, and recounts in multiple states have also failed to change the outcome.

Political experts say the objections will most likely fail to change anything.