NewsIn-Depth

Actions

In-Depth: White Americans accountable for majority of hate crimes in the U.S., a trend on the rise

Hate crime law results in few convictions in Texas
Buffalo Supermarket Shooting
Posted at 5:56 PM, May 16, 2022
and last updated 2022-05-16 22:40:34-04

WACO, Texas — In Buffalo, New York an 18-year-old white man is accused of walking into a grocery store and killing 10 people. Police are calling it a hate crime.

A 180-page manifesto surfaced online shortly after the attack and took credit for the violence in the name of white supremacy.

Republican Rep. Liz Cheney of Wyoming, on Monday, called out what she called a parallel between those beliefs and the behavior of some fellow conservatives.

Several believe in the "Great Replacement."

What is the "Great Replacement"?

It's a conspiracy theory that says non-white individuals are being brought into the United States and other Western countries to "replace" white voters.

Of the 6,780 known offenders in 2020:

  • 55.1 percent were White
  • 21.2 percent were Black or African American
  • 15.7 percent were unknown

Numbers from FBI show that hate crime numbers are up that were submitted by 15,138 law enforcement agencies. Of these agencies who submitted incident reports, there were 8,263 hate crime incidents involving 11,129 offenses.

Supermarket AP.jpeg
People gather outside the scene of a shooting at a supermarket in Buffalo, N.Y., Sunday, May 15, 2022.

White supremacist and far-right killers have dominated the extremist homicide totals since 2018, Brian Levin told the LA Times, director of the Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism at Cal State San Bernardino.

Bias Motivati n Categories20192020
Race/Ethnicity/Ancestry3,9635,227
Religion1,5211,244
Sexual Orientation1,1951,110
Gender Identity198266
Disability157130
Gender6975
Total7,1038,052

A new generation of white supremacists is isolated and online, radicalized by internet memes and misinformation.

“White supremacy is the No. 1 domestic terrorism threat in the United States,” according to Heidi Beirich, co-founder of the Global Project Against Hate and Extremism based in Montgomery, Alabama.

el-paso-01-as-gty-190814_hpMain_4x3_992.jpg
A woman touches a cross at a makeshift memorial for victims outside Walmart, near the scene of a mass shooting which left at least 22 people dead, on Aug. 6, 2019 in El Paso, Texas.

A 2019 mass shooting at an El Paso Walmart has been classified as the deadliest anti-Latino attack in modern U.S. history. The shooter believed a "Hispanic invasion of Texas," was the reason for the shooting. 23 people were killed.

Where does this theory come from?

The theory has roots in French nationalism books dating back to the early 1900s, according to the Anti-Defamation League.

The white supremacist movement has a 14-word slogan, "We must secure the existence of our people and a future for white children", according to the Southern Poverty Law Center, which was coined by David Lane, a member of the white supremacist group The Order.

Hate crime law results in few convictions in Texas

A widespread question between prosecutors, lawmakers, and others in Texas is 'Why have there been so few successful convictions under the hate crime statute?'

Police officials often lack the training to help build successful hate crime cases. In many cases, the most severe sentences are murder or rape. Prosecutors drop the hate element because there is not any punishment available.