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Naming commission speaks to the renaming of Fort Hood

Posted at 8:57 PM, May 25, 2022
and last updated 2022-05-25 21:58:06-04

FORT HOOD, TX — The National Defense Authorization Act of 2021 established a commission of 8 individuals to rename several military installations in the United States.

”There is set criteria for us to review any item, base, or anything named after somebody who voluntarily served the Confederacy,” said Lawrence Romo, member of the Naming Commission and former Director of Selective Service System under the Obama Administration.

One of the bases to be renamed is Fort Hood and to do that they needed help from the community.

”We went and talked to the military leadership, from officers to NCO’s," said Romo. "Also, the civilians on post and the civilian community to get insight on what they thought the name should be.”

Together they came to recommend Fort Hood should be named after the first Hispanic-American 4-star general and former Commanding General of Fort Hood, Richard E. Cavazos.

Something one Fort Hood veteran sees as a great choice.

”I like the candidate because of his strong military history," said William Brummett, incoming commander of VFW post 9191, and retired Fort Hood veteran. "I like the fact that he did a lot on Fort Hood and especially because he was a Fort Hood commander. Knowing the knowledge behind it, that he was a Fort Hood commander, I think he is deserving of it.”

General Cavazos was not only a military pioneer for the Hispanic community, he was a true Texas native.

”He grew up in Kingsville on the King Ranch. Sixth-generation Texan. He went to Texas Tech. He served 2 times on Fort Hood with the last time being the Cops Commander 3-star general. He’s a hero.” said Romo.

Even though veterans like William Brummett, who retired from Fort Hood, like the choice for them it will only be the letters on the sign that are truly changing.

”It will always be Fort Hood," said Brummett. "33-years in Central Texas and I stayed here. It’s going to be Fort Hood forever.”

The new names of Fort Hood and the other installations still need final approval from the Secretary of Defense and Congress before they are officially changed.