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Sickly mountain lion euthanized after wandering into Vail condominium lobby

Mountain lion in Vail condos
Posted at 11:25 AM, Jan 11, 2022
and last updated 2022-01-11 14:54:19-05

VAIl, Colo. — A mountain lion that wandered into a Vail condominium on Saturday was euthanized after wildlife officers discovered it was severely emaciated and in poor health, according to police.

On Saturday, the Vail Police Department responded to two incidents involving a mountain lion in and near multiple resort properties around the Lionshead Village area in Vail, which is just west of the Vail Town Center.

In the first incident, a mountain lion was looking in windows of Vail proprieties, according to Cmdr. Justin Liffick with the police department.

During the second response, a mountain lion was spotted walking into the main lobby of the Vail Spa Condominiums at 710 W. Lionshead Circle, Liffick said. Police were able to confine the animal to a secure area, police said. Once Colorado Parks and Wildlife officers arrived, they darted the mountain lion and immobilized it.

The wildlife officers saw that the animal was "severely emaciated and in poor condition," police said. This likely spurred it to try to get close to humans.

CPW decided to euthanize the mountain lion.

Liffick said police believe both incidents involved the same animal.

Vail police wanted to stress that this sort of behavior from a mountain lion was unusual and sightings are typically rare, though many of the animals call Eagle County home.

"They are usually very elusive and encounters with these wild animals are very rare," Liffick said.

If you are in Vail and see wildlife within town limits, police ask that you report it to the Vail Public Safety Communications Center by calling 970-479-2200. If the wildlife poses a threat to people, domestic animals, or livestock, call 911.

Vail police are reminding residents to never feed, approach or try to cage any local wildlife. To learn more about living among Colorado wildlife, click here. And click here to learn more about mountain lions in our state.