Teacher survey deadline extended after participation numbers dis - KXXV-TV News Channel 25 - Central Texas News and Weather for Waco, Temple, Killeen |

TEXAS

Teacher survey deadline extended after participation numbers disappoint

For years, Texas teacher organizations have lobbied for a statewide survey about school working conditions.  That survey was finally approved by lawmakers and distributed to school districts this year.

Folks with the Association of Texas Professional Educators are surprised by the results, or lack thereof.  In some districts, teachers haven't even touched the surveys. 

Access to resources, class sizes and standardized testing.  These are just of few topics addressed in the Tell Texas survey.  Teacher organizations are hoping the results will send a strong message to state lawmakers. 

ATPE Governmental Relations Manager Jennifer Canaday says, "These are the things we want you to prioritize and these are the things we want you to fund. And having this data to back us up is going to be extremely beneficial."

But most districts throughout the state haven't even reached a 50 percent participation rate.  Administrators were mandated by law to give all teachers the website and code to fill out the anonymous survey, which takes about 25 minutes to complete.

Dale Caffey, Waco ISD's Director of Communications says, "Every principal was given the directive to make the code available to the teachers on their campuses and we've been assured by all of our elementary, middle and high school principals that that code has been shared with the teachers."

The most recent numbers show Waco ISD with a teacher participation rate of nearly 23 percent. That's actually better than most districts in Central Texas.

Canaday says, "It's gong to be quite a disappointment when so many districts don't end up getting a report and I think there will be quite a few legislators who are disappointed that their districts did not promote or support the survey more than they did."

Initially, teachers had from April 7th to May 31st to take the survey.  But the deadline has now been extended to this Friday, June 6th. 

Caffey says, "I do encourage our teachers, being that they have the extension now, to sign on within the next couple of days to take the survey so the legislature gets the feedback they need as they make future decisions about public education in Texas."

To see the participation latest participation numbers for your local school district, click here:

http://telltexas.org/
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