FEMA says Texas has its own money to help West - KXXV-TV News Channel 25 - Central Texas News and Weather for Waco, Temple, Killeen |

FEMA says Texas has its own money to help West

WEST, TX (KXXV) -

FEMA and the White House say Texas can use its own money to rebuild West.

FEMA told Governor Perry in a letter on June 10 that their request for a major disaster declaration was denied. That declaration would have given tens of millions of dollars to help rebuild the town of West.

According to a report on the Dallas Morning News, FEMA denied the request because officials say Texas couldn't justify why the state itself can't afford the millions of dollars. According to the report, FEMA will give $16.6 million for the previous emergency declaration. FEMA says Texas can take care of the rest.

The report also says Texas can tap into its rainy day fund that has billions of dollars, to give to the town.

West mayor Tommy Muska, who was outwardly frustrated with the denial earlier in the week, says he's still disappointed but happy FEMA gave a reason. He does still question the denial and wonders whether or not it was politically motivated.

"So you always have that in the back of your mind, is this because we're Texans? We have a republican governor, we have a democratic president, I don't know. I'd hope not. And West is just in the middle," Muska said.

Muska also says even without FEMA's help they will find a way to get the funds. It just may take a while to sift through several different grants.

"What they don't understand is the longer it takes the more opportunities people have to move out of town which kills the town," Muska said.

Muska says he still thinks Obama is a man of his word. Muska just wants to talk with him and describe what he needs and maybe Obama can pull some strings in Washington.

Governor Perry has 30 days from the denial to appeal the decision.

  • NewsMore>>

  • Political end to Olympics: NKorea offers talks with US

    Political end to Olympics: NKorea offers talks with US

    Sunday, February 25 2018 2:16 AM EST2018-02-25 07:16:08 GMT
    Sunday, February 25 2018 10:49 AM EST2018-02-25 15:49:08 GMT
    (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky). A volunteer walks in a foggy Pyeongchang Olympic Plaza during the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea, Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018.(AP Photo/Patrick Semansky). A volunteer walks in a foggy Pyeongchang Olympic Plaza during the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea, Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018.

    Pyeongchang closes its chapter of the modern Olympics on Sunday night with tales of detente and competitive grit and volunteerism and verve.

    More >>

    Pyeongchang closes its chapter of the modern Olympics on Sunday night with tales of detente and competitive grit and volunteerism and verve.

    More >>
  • After years of dejection, proponents of gun laws see hope

    After years of dejection, proponents of gun laws see hope

    Saturday, February 24 2018 10:35 AM EST2018-02-24 15:35:23 GMT
    Sunday, February 25 2018 10:39 AM EST2018-02-25 15:39:17 GMT
    The progression has become numbingly repetitive - mass bloodshed unleashed by a gunman, followed by the stories of the fallen, the funerals and mourning. (Source: AP Photos)The progression has become numbingly repetitive - mass bloodshed unleashed by a gunman, followed by the stories of the fallen, the funerals and mourning. (Source: AP Photos)

    "Our kids have started a revolution:" Teens' activism after Florida school shooting has some hopeful for action on gun policy.

    More >>

    "Our kids have started a revolution:" Teens' activism after Florida school shooting has some hopeful for action on gun policy.

    More >>
  • 2 dead as severe weather moves eastward through central US

    2 dead as severe weather moves eastward through central US

    Sunday, February 25 2018 2:25 AM EST2018-02-25 07:25:46 GMT
    Sunday, February 25 2018 10:38 AM EST2018-02-25 15:38:57 GMT
    (Liz Dufour/The Cincinnati Enquirer via AP). A view from the Central Bridge shows the flooding from the Ohio River  Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018 in Cincinnati.  Forecasters expected the Ohio River could reach levels not seen since the region's deadly 1997 f...(Liz Dufour/The Cincinnati Enquirer via AP). A view from the Central Bridge shows the flooding from the Ohio River Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018 in Cincinnati. Forecasters expected the Ohio River could reach levels not seen since the region's deadly 1997 f...

    A man in northeast Arkansas and a woman in south central Kentucky both were killed as the storm that also included strong winds, hail and heavy rain that triggered flooding muscled its way through the area, according to authorities.

    More >>

    A man in northeast Arkansas and a woman in south central Kentucky both were killed as the storm that also included strong winds, hail and heavy rain that triggered flooding muscled its way through the area, according to authorities.

    More >>
Powered by Frankly